Spotlight: From Science to Mythology

 

Graphics and Composite by New Dimensions

What is the role of myth in our personal lives? What are the archetypal difficulties of men and women and how do they differ? What happens when we are called to the hero’s journey but don’t listen? How did Einstein discover that imagination was more than facts? How is a Newtonian, mechanistic view still embedded in present day science? The answers to these and many other questions are explored with these wisdom elders in these four MP3s, especially selected from the New Dimensions Program Archive.


Stanley Krippner

Discovering Your Personal Myth 
with David Feinstein, Ph.D. and Stanley Krippner, Ph.D.

Program 2151
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What are the five stages of discovering your personal mythology and why is it important to understand it? How do cultural myths become personal ones? Probing the unconscious and uncovering the source of our behavior patterns serves as the focus for clarifying the role of myth in our personal lives as well as its extension to the culture.  Read more »


Carol Pearson

The Hero Inside
with
 Carol S. Pearson, Ph.D.

Program 2164
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What are the six main archetypes of the Hero’s journey? Pearson provides a map to chart and examine the heroic archetypes that exist in all of us, enabling us to better understand our own quest. Read more » 


The Universe Is A Story
with Brian Swimme, Ph.D.

Program 2218
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Science, humanity and the natural world have all suffered from a myopic fragmentation of scientific knowledge, according to cosmologist Brian Swimme. A new “story of the universe” may come to serve the modern world as primitive myths served in their time, embracing modern scientific knowledge as well as ancient spiritual concepts.  Read more » 


Exploring the Frontiers of Science 
with Beverly Rubik, Ph.D.

Program 2342
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How is science researching the relationship of energy, mind, and matter? Biophysicist Rubik tells us that much more work needs to be done with a more open-minded attitude. She eloquently challenges scientists and educators to soften their rigid adherence to existing models and points towards a “paradigm breakthrough” in ecology and the life sciences.  Read more »