Spotlight: Robert Bly – An Irreverent Storyteller

Graphic and composite by New Dimensions

 

Using truth as expressed in both poetry and fairytales, master poet and word-weaver Robert Bly illuminates inspiring possibilities for a culture caught in an adolescent phase of development. He shines a light on shame, divine imagination, creativity, parenting, siblings, and more. Be delighted by the timeless wisdom in these four MP3s specially selected from the New Dimensions program archive.


William Blake and Beyond 
with Robert Bly

Program 1854
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In this discussion, master poet and word-weaver Robert Bly opens windows into William Blake’s mythic world, sharing with us some of Blake’s poetry as well as some of Bly’s own compositions and insights. He invites us all to awaken to vision, our own creative energies, and the Divine Imagination. Read more »


The Power of Shame 
with Robert Bly

Program 2140
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In this discussion Bly talks of four sources of shame, including shame inherited from parents, grandparents, ancestors, and shame over our bodily and creative instincts. He opens with a Russian fairy story of the Frog Princess and the shame we feel over our interior “Frog Bride.” The discussion includes thoughts on Americans and shame. Read more »


Program 2244
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Bly describes the three life phases for men symbolized by three colors – the “red, white and black” – in the Grimm Brothers’ fairytale “Iron John.” He points to the complications that arise, for example, when a boy skips the red and goes directly to the white. He also discusses how these stages, when fulfilled, affect men’s relationships with women. Read more »


A Society of Siblings
with Robert Bly

Program 2568
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Bly says, “We’re substituting Prozac for depth psychology.” With irreverence and colorful storytelling, he tells us what we should be doing about adolescents, idle elders, television, and computers. His insightful focus illuminates inspiring possibilities of a culture caught in an adolescent phase of development – and possibly ready to move beyond it. Read more »